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The Great Sugar Debate

by Adele Rogers on Friday 19 August 2016



That sweet delight that brings us so much happiness is stirring up a fair amount of floss at the moment. And we don’t mean the sugary kind.

But if you’re anything like us, you’re sick-to-the-hilt of contradictory advice when it comes to sugar! You’ve got 10 different people saying 10 different things - all with valid research to back them up, fancy-looking websites and million-dollar book deals.

Now, let’s say you’re trying to lose weight. You don’t know where to go, or what to do. You go into the bookshop and see I Quit Sugar directly alongside Don’t Quit Sugar. 

What the hell do you do?!

We sat down with Precision Nutrition certified Personal Trainer Joe Wauters who told us that although both of these authors have contributions to make, to win the sweetness battle, ‘you really need figure out a solution that works for yourself, and for most people, it’s not about quitting sugar – it’s about breaking sugar addiction.’

Firstly, what does the word sugar even mean?

There are sugars that occur in fruits, sugar found in milk and dairy products, sugars in honey and barley, and the carbs you eat that are then broken down into glucose.

But while we think bananas are glorious and absolutely crucial to a well-balanced diet – it’s in your best interest to beware of that other stuff.

Joe described it like this.

There’s a field of cane. You process it. And you’ve got a highly addictive white powder at the end.

Yikes.

 

Lucky for us, most adults have developed an awareness of their body and its reaction to the food that they eat. A lifetime of personal experience has taught us that if you eat that second box of peanut M&Ms, you’re probably going to have a pretty sick gut.

While sugar might taste lovely and give you a bit of a high - it’s a short term win. In the long run it’s going to slow you down, and make you feel pretty crappy. After that immediate rush you’re going to crash, feel tired, and crave sugar for the next few days. Once you get clear on the return, next time you’re eyeing off the cookies in the office jar, you can make the right decision.

But Joe’s advice is to consider it as part of your overall wellbeing. Turning down cake on your best friend’s birthday might not make you happy. In the long-run, it’s your overall wellbeing that will help you reach your health and fitness goals.


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